DavidMcG's blog

SHEU data: Fewer young people are now feeling at ease when visiting the doctor

From the early 1980s, SHEU have asked children and young people questions about visiting the doctor.
 
Responses from over 400,000 12-15 year olds cover issues about frequency of visits and feeling at ease ...
 
Fewer young people are now feeling at ease when visiting the doctor
 
 

Latest links from #SHEUres to links about 16+ yr olds and .. Food .. Drugs .. Relationships .. Education .. Exercise .. Health

Welcome to the latest links from #SHEUres to research about 16+ year olds.
 
"I know of no other similar way of quickly accessing research for children and young people across disciplines and sectors."  Lecturer
 
Included in the list -
Is There an Association between Casual Sex and Mental Health among Emerging Adults?
Does being overweight impede academic attainment?
Mental Health and Education Decisions
 
To find the links CLICK HERE
 

Girls' sleep patterns, weight loss, worrying and bullying : SHEU data

The report, Young People into 2013, from the Schools Health Education Unit, contains over 100 health-related behaviour questions and answers. Several questions are about sleep. This year we have continued to try and find links between questions. For example, when asked about how many hours of sleep they had ‘last night’, the more sleep 14-15 year old girls get they are less likely to: ‘want to lose weight’; worry ‘a lot’; and ‘feel afraid of going to school due to bullying.
To read more click this link

Fit or Very Fit: SHEU and Youngsters' Perception of Fitness

SHEU's latest 'Young People into 2013' report captures the attitudes of young people and, in particular, the changes seen from the primary to the secondary stage of pupils’ education. Despite the attention, drawn by some of the media, to extremes of young people’s behaviour, this report presents a more balanced view. For example, more 10-11 year old boys, than any of the other groups, continue to assess themselves as ‘very fit’ but perceived fitness, from youngsters aged 10-15 years, continues to decline both in boys and girls.

Pages